Corporate Art  Co helps clients build charismatic, enduring art collections to reflect your corporation’s character, drive, and interests.

Corporate Art Co has the experience and creativity to meet your objectives and go beyond your expectations. We can handle any size project or budget. Imagine an art gallery that comes to you, listens to your ideas, and presents screened options for your review.

  • Consultations and Art Sales
  • Appraisals and Insurance Replacement Valuations
  • Conservation
  • Existing Collection Inventories

 

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Jun

03

2013

Old Traveler I

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Jun

03

2013

‘Dash’

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Paper is sensitive stuff. Art Appraisers frequently see valuable art that has suffered from fading and damage or is susceptible to environmental stresses. There are many factors that affect the life span of works on paper: lighting, environmental conditions, and framing can result in yellowing, brittleness, spotting, and overall deterioration. Colors can fade, clarity will decrease, and eventually, the value of the image will diminish. According to Holly Hackwith, International Society of Appraisers Accredited Member, when it comes to the value of art, “condition is everything”.

So, how can you tell if your art is at risk? According to the Institute of Conservation, there’s a few common telltale signs to look for. We offer tips to increase the life of your art.

  1. Do you notice that the media’s color has faded or the paper has yellowed? Direct sunlight and interior lighting emit varying degrees of the damaging ultraviolet light that causes paper discoloration and faded inks. Move your art out of the sunlight and replace the existing glass with glass that is specifically manufactured to block the harmful UV light.

    This print has been in a frame for 40 years, and the fading is obvious. Image via silversolvent.blogsopt.com

    This print has been in a frame for 40 years, and the fading is obvious. Image via silversolvent.blogsopt.com

  2. Examine the interior edges of the mat board around the art. Contact with boards containing unpurified wood pulp may turn paper brown and brittle. ‘Mount burn’ describes the brown marks around the edge of an image where an acidic window mount has ‘burnt’ the paper. Brown ‘air-burn’ marks can also form through gaps in old wooden backboards. Replace the mat boards and backing with acid-free or PH balanced boards.

    Direct contact with a mat containing acid can lead to mat burn. Image by spencerart.ku.edu

    Direct contact with a mat containing acid can lead to mat burn. Image via spencerart.ku.edu

  3. Look at the paper from the side, and see if you notice cockling  or undulation. Handmade paper does not always lie flat, but if the paper is badly distorted, wrinkled or even torn at the corners it has probably been taped to the mounting board. Humidity causes paper to shift and it works best to dry mount it. Take the art to a professional framer and have the piece re-mounted.

    Humidity or water damage can cause paper to cockle.

    Humidity or water damage can cause paper to cockle. Image via the Fine Arts Conservancy

  4. Do you see spots forming in the paper? Brown spots called ‘foxing’ are caused by bacteria or mold which generally grows on acidic paper when the humidity is high. Try not to hang pictures directly against the interior of the outside wall of a building: the comparatively low temperature can cause condensation and mold growth inside a frame. Conversely, a radiator or spotlight dries the air out, and concentrates dirt by convection currents.

    Brown spots called foxing are due to mildew or mold.

    Brown spots called foxing are due to mildew or mold. Image via conservationofpaper.org

The Institute of Conservation provides in-depth descriptions and suggestions on their site:  http://www.conservationregister.com/PIcon-careprintsdrawings.asp

Most art collectors do not live in temperature, humidity, and light controlled environments, so it’s critical to take necessary steps to conserve your investments from the very start. Conservation framing is often a one-time expense that will lengthen the life of your art dramatically, and create enjoyment for years to come. CAC provides recommendations for framing, conservation, and restoration.  Please email holly@corporateartco.com to learn how we can help you preserve the value of your art.

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Apr

17

2013

Advice From An Art Dealer

Holly Hackwith has been surrounded by art for the last 28 years, and still gets really excited when she sees new, innovative art. She has lots of advice for artists looking to get their art noticed and purchased.

Consulting1


1. Perfect your craft. Technical fluency is as important as the message of the artwork. A solid command of the medium  communicates the message of the art much more effectively.

2. Keep learning and experimenting to keep your art fresh and interesting.

3. Build your resume by entering regional and national shows. Submit your work to galleries, dealers, and arts organizations. When someone expresses interest in your art, keep in touch with them.

4. Seek out other artists to develop an honest critique group.

5. Find a business mentor, and use available resources to market your work. If you aren’t a business person, explore options to have others market your work.

6. Use social media to keep in touch with your fans. Make sure people know what you’re doing.

There isn’t a magical formula to success, but talent, curiosity, and determination make a big difference.

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If you’ve visited Pinnacle Bank on 181st and Dodge in Omaha, you’ve probably noticed an unusual landscape in the bank lobby. The warm and vibrant landscape painting triptych draws you in for a closer look, which reveals silk woven tubes separate the canvas panels.  Artist Patsy Smith was one of the commissioned artists to produce art for the Pinnacle Bank headquarters. The art produced was intended to be inviting for clients, reinforces corporate values, and tie in with Pinnacle Bank’s branding.

SmithBurg1

Featured art at Pinnacle Bank’s headquarters by Patsy Smith and Myra Burg.

Smith’s most recent paintings are featured in Corporate Art Co’s hallway gallery at the Mastercraft Building on at 1111 North 13th St in Omaha. Holly Hackwith, owner of Corporate Art Co, says Smith’s work is transitional enough to appeal to both traditional and contemporary taste. Smith’s approach to painting is quick, intuitive, and appears to be unplanned, but that is far from the truth.  Her compositions consist of three paintings in one: the first painting defines space, the second produces the textures, and the third commits the message.  Smith’s work is celebratory and dynamic.

Circumstance 24x30

“Circumstance” 24″ x 30″ Oil on canvas. Available through CAC.

Smith lives on a lake near Brady, NE, creates art and teaches in her studio in North Platte, Nebraska. She has been fortunate to have several books and articles written about her work.  She has also won many competitive awards.

Nebraska Gold 18x24

“Nebraska Gold”, 18″ x 24″ oil on canvas. Available through CAC.

Smith has taught art throughout her adult life, and loves to turn her students on to creating their own expressions.  “Believe me when I say, I learn so much from watching and learning from my students.  Education and enthusiasm ignite us all,” Smith said.

Smith’s artistic expressions are statements from her soul. Smith said her paintings express all of her emotions wrapped up in her memories.  “We all have experienced sadness and loss of things we love, but overcoming this and growing, life teaches us we are stronger because of these hurdles we jump,” Smith said.  She paints from a point of abandoned joy in life, which has resulted in her artistic successes.

"Farm House Sunset", 30" x 40" oil on canvas. Available through CAC.

“Farm House Sunset”, 30″ x 40″ oil on canvas. Available through CAC.

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